Stuffed Naan Bread

Stuffed Naan Bread


This recipe is adapted from The Guardian, which does a, ‘how to make the perfect’ series, taking tips from the best chefs and working out the pros and cons.

I adapted this recipe to add in the goat’s cheese and salted honey glaze, as a riff on the Indian Accent blue cheese naan, which was so good we could have eaten it on a loop.

This was my first attempt at a naan, but Mr B, said that it was love at first bite!

A quick shout out to the honey I used in this. An artisanal Brooklyn brand, ‘Bees Knees Salted Honey’ by Bushwick Kitchen, check it out on line or in the shops.


  • 5 tsp. fast action yeast
  • 1 tsp. sugar
  • 150ml warm water
  • 300g strong white bread flour, plus extra for dusting
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 5 tsp. sheep yogurt
  • 2 tsp. melted butter to brush
  • 50g soft goats cheese
  • Salted honey


  • Put the yeast, sugar and two tablespoons of warm water in a bowl and stir well. Leave until it begins to froth
  • Put the flour and salt into a large mixing bowl and whisk to combine
  • Stir the yogurt into the yeast mixture, then make a well in the middle of the flour and pour it in, plus the melted butter
  • Mix, then gradually stir in the water to make a soft, sticky mixture that is just firm enough to call a dough, but not at all dry
  • Tip out on a lightly floured surface and knead for approximately 5 minutes until smooth and a little less sticky, then put in a lightly oiled bowl and turn coat
  • Cover and leave in a draught free place until doubled in size (90-120 minutes)
  • Tip the dough back out on to a lightly floured surface and knock the air out, then divide into 8 balls
  • Meanwhile heat a dry pan for five minutes and put the oven on low
  • Flatten one of the balls and roll into a flat circle, place the cheese in the middle and fold over, flatten out again
  • Place in the hot pan and when it starts to bubble flip over. When browned on each side take off the pan and brush with salted honey
  • Put in the oven to keep warm and cook through

Vegan Jerky

Vegan Jerky


Mushrooms are powerful sources of antioxidants and phytochemicals, best harnessed through eating a mix of raw and cooked mushrooms. This is a great version to use as a snack or put on a pizza or salad

I decided to make these after seeing vegan jerky in the supermarket being sold for 12.99. With two Portobello mushrooms from $3, I thought it was worth the saving!

These are made with an easy marinade and quick dehydration, so very little cooking or effort for such a versatile dish

Mr B likes the smoky umami taste and said he preferred the texture to the meat version


  • 2 Portobello mushrooms, cut into ¾ inch strips


  • 3 tbsp. tamari
  • 2 tbsp. maple syrup
  • 2 tbsp. apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tsp. chilli powder
  • 3 drops liquid smoke
  • Black pepper to taste


  • Soak the mushrooms in the marinade for a minimum of 4 hours. I left them to soak and absorb the marinade over night
  • Dehydrate at 115f for 6 hours in a dehydrator or oven until mushrooms are dried but not chewy


Chilli Chocolate Vegan Samosas

Chilli Chocolate Vegan Samosas


I was inspired to create this for a competition where we were asked to use cacao in a creative way. My first thought was to make my grandmothers samosas with a chilli chocolate slant on them. (Mr B’s influence as two of his favourite flavour profiles). I wasn’t sure this would work, but I felt my grandma was urging me on, if only to see me make my first samosa

Well it did work and I’d encourage you to give it a try. It has some wonderfully deep, rich flavours from the garam masala and chilli, with an earthy tone from the cacao and smoked paprika

‘Creativity is the courage to let go of certainty’.

I didn’t want to let go of the certainty of my grandma’s recipe, but this competition pushed me out of my comfort zone and to something new in our relationship. A collaboration of sorts, a recipe created hand in hand, partly from heritage and partly from something new. Growth isn’t just a case of learning something new but about unlearning old limits too


  • 1 tsp. olive oil
  • 1 onion, chopped
  • 2 tsp. chilli powder (adapt to heat preference)
  • 1 tsp. smoked paprika
  • 1 tbsp. garam masala
  • 1 tsp. ground coriander
  • 1 tsp. cumin
  • 500g vegan mince
  • 20g cacao powder
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • 1 tsp. flour
  • 2 tbsp. water
  • 10 spring roll wrappers


  • Heat the olive oil, add the onion and fry till translucent, add garlic and fry for 30 seconds
  • Add spices for 30 seconds
  • Add vegan mince and stir till equally distributed
  • Cook down for 20 minutes
  • Taste and adjust for seasoning
  • Let cool
  • Mix the water and flour together to use as a glue for the samosa pastry
  • Fold, fill and seal (see picture for instructions)
  • Bake or fry and serve with a coriander dipping sauce

Processed with MOLDIV


Mushroom Pate (Raw, Vegan, GF)

Mushroom Pate (Raw, Vegan, GF)

Raw Mushroom Pate

This is a lovely starter/canapé. It has a silky texture and earthy tone from the walnuts and mushrooms so your carnivorous guests will think it is made of liver, whilst your herbivore guests will lap it up for exactly the opposite reason.

It takes 5 minutes preparation and can be used for many different things, including a pasta sauce, an umami topping on a burger or a dip for crackers. I edited the recipe, which I took from Plant Food (Matthew Kenney, Meredith Baird, Scott Winegard), decreasing the amount of mushroom powder used to decrease the saltiness and adding fresh thyme to give a little brightness.

Mr B who is not a fan of liver Pate, loved this, although thought I was trying to trick him into eating traditional Pate until I showed him the process pictures.


  • 3 cups mushrooms (Portobello’s, Oysters, Shitake)
  • 1 cup walnuts
  • ¼ cup mushroom powder
  • 1 tbsp. agave nectar
  • 1 tbsp. tamari
  • 1 tbsp. fresh thyme
  • 1 tbsp. agar
  • 1 tsp. sesame oil


  • Blend all ingredients, for around 8 minutes or until the blender is warm. (I wouldn’t usually recommend this, but in this case you need it to get warm to activate the agar)
  • Pour into a lined terrine mold (I used a small bread pan) and refrigerate for 2 hours to set



Delicious Japanese Dashi Ramen


Delicious Japanese Dashi Ramen

I have spent a lot of time in Japan over the years for work and for pleasure and I marvel at the way Japanese chefs elevate simple pure ingredients. Whether it is Sashimi, Tofu or Dashi, there is always a simple elegance in preparation and presentation, making sure the ingredient is the star of the plate!

Dashi is a baseline broth; the equivalent of chicken stock in Japanese cooking. It is used in its simplest form as a cleansing broth but it is also added to multiple dishes as a base umami flavour

I love it in it’s purest form and love to have it on its own or use it as a base for ramen, adding some combination of noodles and vegetables. This dish takes less than 10 minutes, so after a long day at work, it is a great way to warm up and get some dinner at the same time


  • 5g Kombu
  • ½ cup bonito flakes
  • 2 cups water
  • One head purple broccoli
  • 2 tbsp. Coconut aminos*
  • 1 tsp. sesame oil
  • 1 handful buckwheat soba noodles

*Coconut aminos comes from the sap of the coconut tree, it has very low glycemic levels, 17 amino acids and in plentiful in minerals and vitamins. Use it as a substitute to soya sauce/tamari


  • Bring the cold water to the boil with the kombu, once you have reached a gentle boil, remove from heat and remove the kombu
  • Sprinkle bonito flakes in and let stand for 3 minutes, sieve and place back on the heat
  • Add the coconut aminos and sesame oil
  • Add the soba noodles and simmer for 3 minutes
  • In the mean time, lightly steam the broccoli, chop and add to the soup
  • Serve steaming hot, for a ramen facial

Here is a picture of Me and Mr B in Kyoto, Japan, as it would be amiss to leave him out of the post and he is not a fan of Ramen!



Porcini Cracker with Chives (GF, V)

Porcini Cracker with Chives


The wonderful thing about dehydrating food is that there is very little method involved (blend, spread, dehydrate), the food retains it nutrients due to the low temperature and the flavors of whatever you are cooking intensify

This is my second attempt in the dehydrator, adapting a recipe from Matthew Kenney’s Plant Food, to create an umami savory sweet cracker. I offered these crackers to my tasters, without telling them about the method, and they loved them. It is hard to believed that there is no grain or flour in them, just almond and flax seeds and a little seasoning. If you don’t have a dehydrator, an oven, whilst you are in the house on a cold afternoon does the trick just as well

I liked these crackers with a little tofu cream cheese and fresh chives (see previous recipes) but Mr B is quite fond of them on their own, as a portable snack


Porcini crackers

  • 1 cup almonds, soaked overnight
  • ½ cup water
  • 5 tbsp. tamari or coconut aminos
  • 1 tbsp. porcini powder
  • 1 tbsp. agave
  • ¼ cup flax seeds


  • Tofu cream cheese
  • 1 bunch chives, chopped to ½ cm pieces


  • Mix the porcini ingredients together in a blender. Spread 1.4 inch thick on parchment paper and dehydrate for 4 hours at 115f. Punch out shapes with a cookie cutter. Return to dehydrator on screens until dry and crisp, approximately 12 hours. If you don’t have a dehydrator, use the oven on the warm setting.
  • Pipe or spread on the tofu cream cheese
  • Top with chives

Vegan Chorizo Empanadas


Vegan Chorizo Empanadas

This was the most popular dish at my vegan Mexican feast and my guests didn’t believe the filling was not actually made with chorizo. I made 24 for six people and we had just a couple left over. Mr B, said he was dreaming about these all night and so we ended up having the rest for breakfast the next day!

The trick to this dish and any meat substitute is to impart the flavours of the dish you are impersonating. For the chorizo therefore the balance of smoky paprika and chilli for the subtle smoky spicy undertone, is the key. Don’t be afraid to be bold with the spicing as you’ll be wrapping these babies with a blanket of puff pasty and so will have to get through that first to get to the flavor

These are great for breakfast, lunch or dinner, as Mr B will attest, as well as holding up well during travel, for a picnic or packed lunch


  • 2 tbsp. coconut oil
  • 1 lb. vegan mince
  • 1 large onion, chopped
  • 3 garlic cloves, minced
  • ½ tsp. oregano dry
  • 1 tsp. cumin
  • 2 tsp. smoked paprika
  • ½ tsp. chilli powder
  • ½ tsp. salt or more to taste
  • ½ tsp. black pepper
  • ½ cup. Vegetable broth
  • 1 tsp. raw sugar
  • 4 sheets of puff pastry
  • Water and almond milk for glazing


  • In a medium skillet heat the coconut oil
  • Add the vegan mince, sauté for a few minutes, add onions and garlic and continue cooking until the onions are soft and translucent
  • Add the oregano, cumin, smoked paprika, chilli powder, salt, pepper, vegetable broth and sugar
  • Cook for 10-15 minutes till the broth is gone
  • Add more smoked paprika or chilli powder to taste
  • Preheat the oven to 350f/250c
  • Working with one puff pastry sheet at a time, roll it out so it is long enough to cut 6 circles in with a pastry cutter
  • Fill each with a tbsp. of the mixture, brush half of the inside of the round with water and pinch shut, use a fork to seal again on the outside which also creates a lovely picture
  • Brush with almond milk on the outside to glaze
  • Repeat with the remaining ingredients,
  • Poke wholes in the empanadas and place on a baking tray
  • Bake for 20-25 minutes or until golden brown
  • Serve warm or cold