Mushroom Stroganoff (Vegan, DF, GF)

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‘Winter is a season of recovery and preparation’.

Stroganoff is an old classic Russian recipe from the 18th century, that has become popular around the world. You can imagine people eating this dish on a cold snowy day, which is why it has become so popular as a warming winter dish in other places and the USA is no exception.

I took this particular recipe from Healthy Living James as featured in Vegan Food and Living. It is rich from the coconut milk, substituting for the cream and has deep flavors from the smoked paprika, dijon mustard and garlic. You can use it for canapés, eat it on toast for breakfast or with rice for dinner and it only takes 30 minutes to make.

Ingredients

  • 1kg mushrooms, sliced
  • 2 red onions, sliced
  • 4 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 2 tins of unsweetened coconut milk
  • 2 tsp. smoked paprika
  • 2 tsp. Dijon mustard
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • Large handful of parsley
  • 3 tbsp. coconut oil
  • Salt and pepper

Method

  • Heat a large pot with oil, adding the garlic, onions and mushrooms with a large pinch of salt and pepper
  • Cook for 5 minutes, stirring as you go along
  • Once the mushrooms are soft, add the coconut milk, paprika, mustard and lemon juice and stir well
  • Cook on a high heat to allow the sauce to thicken, cook for 20-25 minutes of until thick and reduced, keeping stirring to make sure it doesn’t stick
  • Finally add freshly chopped parsley
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Vegetarian Shami Kebabs  (V, DF, GF)

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‘Food has a story, a history, relationships’

I adapted this recipe from Season by Nik Sharma, using Quorn to make it vegetarian.

Kebabs have a long and interesting history, and mostly trace their origin to the influence of Mughlai cuisine. This cuisine is strongly influenced by the cuisine of Central Asia, the region where the early Turko-Mongol Mughal Emperors originally hailed from in the 16th century. The deep spices and meat where seen as luxurious foods and used for royal dinners and celebrations. In our family, meat was also seen like that as my grandma was vegetarian and so it wasn’t an every day occurrence.

This is an easy recipe, it’s just a mix and fry. You can bake them too, but they tend to dry out a little due to their being little fat in the mixture.

Ingredients

  • 1lb vegetarian mince
  • 1 cup finely diced onion
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • ½ cup chickpea flour
  • 2 chilis, minced
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 inch ginger, grated
  • 1 tbsp. fresh lime
  • 1 tsp. cayenne pepper
  • 1 tsp. coriander powder
  • 1tsp dried mint
  • ½ tsp. ground cinnamon
  • ½ tsp. dried sage
  • ½ tsp. sea salt
  • Oil for frying

Method

  • In a large bowl, mix the mince, onion, egg, chickpea flour, chilies, garlic, ginger, lime juice, cayenne, coriander, mint, cinnamon, sage and salt
  • Mix thoroughly
  • Divide into 10 portions
  • Heat 2 tbsp. oil and fry the kebabs in batches, adding more oil as needed until golden brown, 3-5 minutes each side
  • Drain on paper towels
  • Serve with chutney, on their own or with naan

Sweet and Sour Mixed Nuts (Vegan, DF, GF)

This recipe is from season by Nik Sharma, ‘I am an immigrant and I tell my story through food’.

This is a beautiful cookbook and a tail of a life and culinary journey through India and America. It is a book that tells the tale of the inherent tension between originality and origin. It is the familiar story of how food becomes a tool of acclimatization and acceptance and how on that journey it is a friend and teacher in times of discomfort and in finding yourself once again.

I love this cookbook not only for its beautiful pictures and recipes, but for the familiar story it tells, of getting to know yourself through food. For immigrants, food can represent heritage, home and your life journey. When you doing know where you are or who you are, your nostalgic dishes will give you back your pathway and identity. From the porridge you ate as a child with your grandma, or the celebratory dish that was always placed center stage at birthdays, food can take you back in time and give you comfort as you make your journey far away from the place you once started.

This recipe is a tantalizing combination of sweet, sour, salty and spicy. Make it to snack on or to serve to guests.

Nuts are a rich source of protein, omega-3 fatty acid and dietary fiber.

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp. unsalted vegan butter, melted
  • 2 tbsp. pomegranate molasses
  • 2 tsp. coconut sugar
  • ½ tsp. pomegranate powder
  • ½ tsp. sumac
  • ½ tsp. cayenne pepper
  • ½ tsp. fine sea salt
  • 1 cup raw cashews
  • ½ cup raw shelled pistachios
  • ½ cup halved walnuts

Method

  • Preheat the oven to c. 300f
  • Line a baking tray with parchment paper
  • In a medium bowl, stir together the melted butter, pomegranate molasses, sugar, pomegranate powder, sumac, cayenne and salt to form a smooth paste
  • Fold in the nuts and stir to make sure there is an even coat
  • Transfer to the baking sheet and spread out
  • Bake for 20-25 minutes or until lightly brown
  • Remove the baking sheet from the oven and cool before serving
  • If not using immediately, cool and keep in an airtight glass jar

Marinated Tofu with Miso Jam & Edo Spice (Vegan, DF, GF)

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‘The mind is like Tofu. It tastes like whatever you marinate it in’.

This is a beautiful recipe and I would recommend it to anyone who likes Tofu. My beautiful cousin, Sabrina, bought me a selection of spices and it came with some suggested recipes.

The key here is to make sure you get as much water out of the tofu as possible. The resulting dish is a wonderful combination of the char from the tofu, the salty sweet umami from the miso jam and the acid and spice from the spice mix. I have given a suggestion for if you don’t have Edo spice, but you can just sprinkle anything you have or that suits your palate, making it your own recipe.

Mr. B doesn’t like Tofu or miso, so this is recipe is just for me.

Ingredients

  • 12oz block of firm tofu
  • ¼ cup oil
  • 2 tbsp. mirin
  • 2 tbsp. mushroom powder
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 batch miso jam
  • 2 spring onions/scallions (for garnish)

Miso Jam

  • 1 tbsp. mirin
  • 2 tbsp. sake
  • 6 tbsp. sweet white miso
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 tsp. fresh lemon juice

Method

  • Drain the tofu, then cut it like a loaf of bread into six, ¾ inch slabs
  • Arrange the tofu on a single layer on a cloth, lay more towels on top and weigh down to squeeze out as much water as possible
  • Let stand for at least 20 minutes
  • In the meantime, make the marinade by whisking oil, mirin, shitake powder, ginger and a pinch of salt. It will be spreadable but thick
  • Transfer the tofu slabs to a plate and arrange them in a single layer. Brush the tops with the marinade, then flip and cover the other side. Let stand for 30 minutes
  • During this time make the jam but whisking the ingredients together over a low heat, whisking until it is firm enough to hold a soft peak. Immediately take the jam off the heat and place in a bowl to make sure it doesn’t continue to cook
  • Heat a non-stick pan, add the remaining oil. Add the tofu slabs and pan fry under nicely browned on all sides
  • Transfer tofu to a serving plate
  • Spread a dollop of miso jam on top of each slab, sprinkle the mixed spice* on top and a few bits of scallion.

*If you don’t have Edo Spice – a mix of 7 spices from Japan, add sesame seeds, chili flakes and some lemon zest

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Jackfruit Peking Duck (Vegan)

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My mum used to serve Peking Duck as an intermediary course at her amazing dinner parties. I remember our not so large living room being filled with conversation and laughter as I would go around serve the canapes and my brother would help top up the drinks. My mum was really in her element in those situations, entertaining and listening out for the comments and compliments on the food. I don’t think I have ever seen her happier.

Of course, as many of you know, I try and replicate this nostalgia through my own dinner parties with just an eye to my own plant-based interpretations.

‘Food has no soul, you as a cook must bring soul to the recipe’

Peking Duck also featured heavily in our celebrations, as we would always congregate at our local Chinese restaurant to celebrate birthdays and special occasions. This is a theme for Indian families, and I have never worked out why, apart from perhaps the ability to accommodate large parties and the willingness to supply chopped up chilis to us in abundance.

My brother loves this dish so much that it is also his comfort food at home and so this recipe is dedicated to him. It is my way of showing him that I care, taking his favourite dish and making it heart healthy so he can eat it at will and see it as a healthy snack versus an unhealthy treat. Dev, this recipe is from my heart to yours, in recognition of our memories and the nostalgia we share.

Ingredients

  • 2 cans of jackfruit
  • 3 tsp. tamari
  • 3 tbsp. maple syrup
  • ½ tsp coriander powder
  • ½ tsp pepper
  • 1 tsp. sesame oil
  • 3 spring onions, finely sliced
  • ½ cucumber, cut into strips
  • 8-10 Chinese pancakes
  • 150ml hoisin sauce

Method

  • Heat the grill on high
  • Drain the jackfruit and pat dry
  • Combine the tamari, maple syrup, coriander, pepper and sesame oil
  • Coat the jackfruit in the mixture and place under the grill
  • Grill for 10 minutes, turning 2/3 times until crispy
  • Warm the pancakes, serve with the cucumber, spring onion and hoisin sauce

 

Happy New Year!

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Dear Friends of Tasha. Kitchen,

Happy New Year!

My wish for you is to Live Better, Strive Harder, Be Bolder, Dream Bigger, Climb Higher and Seek Greater.

These too are wishes for myself and in the pursuit of this at the end of the year I took some time out to self reflect on all I have learnt over the last year.

In 2018, I completed my certificate in Plant Based Nutrition with Cornell and have used this and some great books (e.g. how not to die – Gene Stone and Michel Greger), articles and blogs to learn more about the hard science behind food and disease.  Many of you may have seen my blog evolve over that time, from broad based healthy food to more of a plant-based blog. This is a reflection of my learning and has caused me to sit back and think about what my own philosophy is and what the blog should centre around.

After much study, contemplation and a recommitment to both my followers, and myself I am pleased to announce a new blog coming soon. The blog will be dedicated to Vegetarian, Vegan and Raw recipes with a focus on Plants and Whole Foods to maximise the nutritional content. There will also be a new section where I will share scientific research, so you can learn with me.

The blog will be called PlantToTable.com and exists today but with a redirect to Tasha.Kitchen until it is ready for launch in early 2019. Tasha.Kitchen will resume this Saturday and an announcement will be made when the new blog is ready.

I hope that this news allows you to forgive my absence and I look forward to continuing our journey together.

Yours faithfully,

Tasha x

King Trumpet Yakitori (Vegan, DF, GF)

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A little advice from a mushroom;

  • Be down to earth
  • Sprout new ideas
  • Keep a low profile
  • Know when to show up
  • Stay well-rounded
  • Start from the ground up
  • Be a fun-guy

This is a beautiful recipe for a BBQ. It is meaty and sticky and sweet and sumptuous.

Mushrooms are always said to be a great meat substitute but I don’t see it as a substitute but a star in it’s own right. I use a variety of mushrooms in my recipes due to the medicinal benefits; Trumpet versus the others is good for something you want to give more structure to, which is why it works so well on this recipe.

Be careful with the reduction, as it can get hot due to the melted sugar. If it toughens up just reheat.

Ingredients

  • 1 spring onion, thinly sliced
  • 1/3 cup mirin
  • 1/3 cup sake
  • 1/3 cup tamari
  • 1/3 cup coconut sugar
  • trumpet mushrooms
  • 1 tsp. coconut oil
  • Salt

Method

  • Soak 6-10 bamboo skewers for at least 15 minutes
  • Prepare grill/BBQ for medium heat
  • Thread the mushrooms onto the prepared skewers and brush with oil and salt
  • Grill until golden brown
  • Heat the mirin, sake, tamari and sugar until slightly reduced
  • Brush on the mushrooms and grill again, flip and brush again
  • Serve with spring onions on top

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