Edamame dumplings

Edamame Dumplings

Follow your passion on a voyage of discovery…

When you move to a new city, it can be both intimidating and exhilarating all at the same time.

Starting again is hard, finding new friends and building connections, getting to know the secrets of a city, where and what to eat. It’s like being a child again, exploring the world and seeing what brings you joy and what you should stay away from.

The interesting part of starting again, is understanding what you keep and what you choose to let go of. What motivates you, what drives you, what brings you joy. Simple good healthy food, continues to be my passion. If you are reading this and know the restaurant scene in the USA, then please feel free to recommend some places to try, and I will gladly try them and review them on this site!

I found this dish in a Japanese restaurant in Chelsea New York, as recommended by a friend from the UK, that I went to try out with a new foodie friend, Ms. M*. This particular dish brought us so much joy, that I decided to make my own version so we could eat them all the time. Ms. M was a patient taster and this is the version we deemed the best for its balance of simplicity and subtle umami undertone.

The restaurant dumplings use ricotta to add a smooth richness to the mixture and dilute the concentrated Edamame taste. I wanted mine to be vegan, so I substituted this with a little white miso, to create a similar affect. I kept the inside of the dumpling simple, as a part of the beauty of this dish is the burst of truffle from the drizzle of oil at the end.

This is a Tasha.Kitchen original, feel free to copy, creativity should be shared

*A little about Ms. M. She is a serial entrepreneur, among other things, running her own consultant firm (http://fayerconsulting.com) and charity (www.herhealtheq.org) dedicated to health equality for woman. She is a great travel and foodie partner in crime, a dedicated taster for Tasha.Kitchen, a genuinely amazing friend and an inspiration to us all.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Edamame, shelled, cooked, drained
  • 1 teaspoon white miso paste
  • Salt, to taste
  • 20 wonton wrappers
  • 1-2 cups pre-made veggie broth, for steaming
  • Truffle oil for drizzling

Method

  • In a food processor, pulse together the Edamame and Miso. Taste and adjust for salt.
  • Lay half of the wonton wrappers out on your work surface. Set the rest in a pile next to you, along with a small bowl of water for sealing the edges
  • Spoon a teaspoon of filling in each
  • Wipe a bit of water on all 4 edges. Fold the wrapper in half to form a triangle
  • Simmer broth in a medium skillet. Add enough broth so that it covers the bottom of the pan at least an inch deep.
  • Drop wontons in the pan in a single later.
  • Cover and steam for about 2 minutes or until the wontons are cooked through but still al dente
  • Divide steamed wontons among plates, drizzle with the truffle oil

Beet tartare

Processed with MOLDIV

Life is your canvas…paint it with your dreams!

My dreams are normally full of food. If you know me well and see me staring off into the distance, you’ll know its because I am thinking about my next meal, the meal I just had or a recipe I am working on. It is therefore natural for me to combine food and art.

Beetroots have such amazing colors, my favourite is the deep ruby red because of the colour but also the antioxidant qualities you get with it.

This recipe is my healthy vegan version of beef tartar using those beautiful red beets to create a hearty, beet tartare. The dish has a lovely crunch and salinity from the capers and a smooth heat from the mustard.

I loved playing with this dish, as when you have finished you have a pink paint and a white cream cheese base to play with. It lets your inner artist (and child out) and what could be more fun than that!

This is a Tasha. Kitchen original, feel free to copy, creativity should be shared!

Ingredients

  • 2 small beets
  • 1 tsp. capers
  • 1½ tbsp. olive oil
  • 1 tsp. mustard
  • 1 tsp. apple cider vinegar
  • ¼ tsp. sea salt
  • 3 tbsp. vegan cream cheese (see prior recipe)
  • Chives, chopped (for garnish)

Method

  • Preheat an oven to 350c
  • Bake the beetroots in salt for 40 mins or until slightly tender
  • Remove from the oven and let cool
  • Once cooled chop into roughly 1cm x 1cm pieces
  • Whisk together the mustard, vinegar, oil, and salt.
  • Transfer beets to a small bowl and mix with the dressing
  • Smear plate with the vegan cream cheese and place the beetroot on top using a cookie cutter or ramekin
  • Garnish with chopped chives

Popcorn Beets

Popcorn Beets

‘Creativity is a way to share your soul with the world’

This is my healthy vegan version of Amanda Cohen’s popcorn beets, which have been deemed better than popcorn shrimp by the food critics.

Mr. B loves popcorn shrimp, so although I haven’t tried Cohen’s dish, I was inspired to make my own version and see what he thought.

Cohen’s version is soaked in buttermilk spiked with bourbon and deep-fried. I wanted to make a healthier and dairy free version, so I soaked mine in almond milk and baked them to make them vegan and a guilt free snack. She served her dish with a green curry sauce; I used vegan cream cheese and jalapenos to replicate the creamy and spicy compliments.

Mr. B loved this dish, noting it as moreish (as shown by the disappearance of the dish in 5 seconds) and addictive. Success! Thanks Amanda Cohen for the inspiration!

This is a tasha.kitchen original recipe, feel free to copy it, creativity should be shared!

Ingredients

  • 2 red beetroots
  • 1 cup cornmeal
  • ¾ cup almond milk
  • Pinch salt
  • 2 tbsp. vegan cream cheese
  • I tbsp. coconut oil
  • 1 jalapeno, sliced

Method

  • Preheat an oven to 350c
  • Bake the beetroot in salt for 20 mins until slightly tender
  • Take them out and let cool, once cooled chop into roughly 2cm x 2cm pieces
  • Pour almond milk into a shallow bowl/dish and cornmeal into another
  • Coat the beet pieces with the milk and then the cornmeal
  • Place pieces on the a baking tray with coconut oil and place in the oven
  • Flip over half way and back until the cornmeal is hard
  • Sprinkle sea salt on the pieces
  • Serve with vegan cream cheese and slices of jalapeño

Goat Curry and naan bread (Dairy free, Gluten Free, Paleo)

Cooking is love made visible.

Goat curry

I am of Indian decent as you can tell from any pictures of myself and even from my Tasha. Kitchen emoji, but as a child I never quite connected to my Indian heritage. The reasons for this are quite logical; I was born in the UK, my family are Christian not Hindi, apart from my Grandma and I was never taught any Indian language.

It was only as I grew older that I realised culture was much more than where you are born and what language you speak. The Indian culture at least as I have observed it through living with my Grandma is about community and connection. She would open her home up to anyone, for lunch, tea or just a chat. She talked to everyone on the high street and brought them chocolate or samosas on their birthdays. I would often come home from school and be greeted by people I had never met before. Food very much played a part in this, she would make lots of Indian snacks to serve people with their tea –  tikki, samosas, pakora’s –  there were always plenty of tasty morsels being offered around.

One of my favorite days of the week was Sunday when we would gather as a family (and invite others to join us) for lunch after church and meat curry would often be a central dish. This goat curry is in honor of those Sundays, which I miss so much. My grandma used to cook curry’s for days to give depth and tenderness to the meat; we would smell that beautiful aroma and often end up smelling of that aroma too! I used a slow cooker and cooked this for 36 hours, but you can cook it for a few hours if you don’t have time. Having cooked this dish, I can say that I have much more appreciation of how long it takes to make a curry that tastes anything like my grandma’s and if I could go back, I would have the extra spoonful my Grandma offered me, every single time.

This recipe comes from myheartbeets.com, an Indian Paleo website that I recently found. Thank you Ashley for your amazing recipes and for helping connect back to my grandma and my roots.

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds goat meat
  • 2 red onions, chopped
  • 5 inch knob fresh ginger, minced
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • 4 whole cloves
  • 2 cardamom pods
  • 1 tbsp. coriander powder
  • 1 tsp. cumin powder
  • 2 tsp. salt (adjust to taste)
  • 1 tsp. turmeric powder
  • 1 tsp. chili powder
  • 1 tsp. paprika
  • 1-2 Serrano pepper, minced
  • 1 small (14 ounce) can organic diced tomatoes
  • 1 tsp. garam masala add more to taste

Method

  • In crock pot/slow cooker, add all ingredients listed except tomatoes, water and garam masala (you will add this at the end)
  • Set to high and cook for 4 hours, stirring the curry every hour or so
  • After four hours, add tomatoes, garam masala and water. Cook on high for another hour or until the meat is tender
  • If you don’t have a slow cooker, cook the onions till translucent for 2-5 mins, then add the garlic and garlic for 30 seconds
  • Add all the spices and stir till mixed in, but make sure not to burn, next add the goat meat and brown
  • Add in can of tomatoes and garam masala and cook for as long as possible, 60-90 minutes minimum

3 Ingredient Paleo Naan (Indian bread)

Ingredients

  • ½ cup Almond Flour
  • ½ cup Tapioca Flour
  • 1 cup Organic Coconut Milk
  • Optional salt

Method

  • Mix all the ingredients together
  • Heat a non-stick pan over a medium heat and pour batter
  • Once the batter fluffs up and looks firm/mostly cooked, flip it over to cook the other side (be patient, this takes a little time) and serve hot

Vegan Pistachio ice cream

Vegan Pistachio Ice Cream

This blog is dedicated to my grandma, as it is her birthday today and she would have been 93.

My grandma loved Pistachio ice cream. We would buy it from all over London are were so excited to give her the bag and watch her taste the ice cream. The look on her face when she tasted good pistachio ice cream was pure delight and happiness, like she was trying it for the first time and her smile always so radiant that it would light up the whole room. My Grandma usually fasted for most of the day, so the evening meal and desert was extra special too.

My grandma was amazing in so many different ways. Many people called her a pure soul and felt better just to be in her presence. She was such an inspiration, teaching us all to be better every day through her generous love and acceptance. I never felt like I had to be anything but me when I was around my Grandma and I couldn’t be as she would see straight through to my core and loved me for all that I was. I miss her every day, but am thankful for her many lessons and for all her unconditional love. Happy Birthday Bigmama.

IMG_3270

This dish takes less than 5 minutes to make and so if you really want to show off you can make it in front of your guests! The ice cream is made in the blender with avocado for creaminess and frozen banana for sweetness as well as the ice cream temperature and texture.

I found this recipe in vegetarian living, a UK magazine, featuring Rens Kroes and a few recipes from her book, Power Food: original recipes for healthy happy living.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup of shelled pistachios (divided into 2)
  • ½ tsp. sea salt
  • 1 tbsp. maple syrup
  • ½ avocado
  • 2 frozen ripe bananas, sliced
  • 1 tsp. pure vanilla extract
  • ½ tsp. almond extract
  • 1 tbsp. almond milk (optional)

Method

  • Roughly chop a handful of pistachios and toast them in a dry frying pan with the salt. Add the maple syrup, stir, then set aside and allow to cool
  • Put the avocado, frozen bananas, vanilla extract, almond extract, almond milk (if you want a thinner mixture) and the remaining pistachio nuts into a food processor, and process until a creamy ice cream has formed
  • Serve the ice cream in bowls, with a good sprinkling of the toasted caramelized nuts

Miso Hummus

Miso Hummus

‘Balance is not something you find, its something you create’.

Mr. B loves hummus and I love Miso, so when this recipe fell into my lap, it was like the same serendipity that brought us together.

They say opposites attract and that was certainly true for the two of us. Mr. B is a night owl and I am a morning person, he has a sweet tooth and mine is salty, I like to eat every two hours and he likes to eat once a day, I like to swim and he likes to run, I like classical music and he likes rock. I don’t think that we agree on anything, apart from loving each other, but we certainly do balance each other out.

I love this recipe for the clash and ultimate balance, the unapologetic salinity and intensity of the umami-rich miso, which is balanced by the mellow richness of the tahini and chickpea.

This blog comes a little early as I am attempting to get some balance by taking my first day off this year.

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup (60 g) blanched almonds
  • 2 cups (450 g) cooked chickpeas or 1 can of cooked chickpeas
  • 1/4 cup (60g) tahini
  • 1/4 cup (60g) white miso
  • 2 cloves garlic, crushed
  • Juice from 1/2 lemon/ 2 tbsp. plus more as needed
  • About 1/2 cup (120 ml ice water)
  • Fine-grain sea salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • Toasted sesame oil (optional)

Method

  • In a food processor blend almonds meal, chickpeas until the beans are crumbly and light
  • Add in the tahini, miso, garlic and lemon juice. Blend again for 2 minutes or so, then scrape down the sides of the machine
  • Switch on the blender start drizzling in enough water so that the hummus billows up, aerated and fluffy
  • Depending on the beans, you may not use all the water, or you might need more
  • Let the machine go for 2-3 minutes after the consistency seems right. Taste and check for seasoning
  • For a roasted accent, drip in some toasted sesame oil

Salmon Ceviche

Salmon Belly Cerviche

Ceviche is a seafood dish popular in the coastal regions of Latin America and the Caribbean. The dish is typically made from raw fish cured in citrus juice such as lemon or lime and spiced with pepper or chilli. Additional seasonings such as chopped onions, salt and cilantro may be added.

It’s a healthy dish and can be made in a matter of minutes, you just need to make sure the fish is fresh, which is one of the advantages of living in a place like Boston, where not only can you get fresh sushi grade fish, but you can track it back to the fisherman who caught it.

I bought my salmon belly from Red’s Best, who offer traceability for their seafood, this means that the customer can trust that the seafood is caught locally, labelled correctly and subjected to quality control along its journey. Trust that an intelligently minimised carbon footprint maintains traceability without undue burden on natures footprint.

Ingredients

  • 500g salmon
  • 1 garlic clove – crushed
  • 1 red chili – finely chopped
  • ½ cup lime juice – freshly squeezed
  • coriander – finely chopped
  • ½ red onion – finely sliced
  • Salt & pepper – to taste

Method

  • Wash and slice your salmon
  • Place in a shallow ceramic or glass dish. Season with salt and pepper.
  • Combine juice, chili, garlic and coriander and pour over your salmon
  • Stir the fish gently to ensure it is completely coated with the juice mixture
  • Place the sliced red onion on top of your fish while it ‘cooks’
  • Let your fish ‘cook’ for an hour. You can leave it for as little as 5 minutes if you are in a hurry.
  • Drain the salmon mixture and plate
  • Serve immediately