Edamame dumplings

Edamame Dumplings

Follow your passion on a voyage of discovery…

When you move to a new city, it can be both intimidating and exhilarating all at the same time.

Starting again is hard, finding new friends and building connections, getting to know the secrets of a city, where and what to eat. It’s like being a child again, exploring the world and seeing what brings you joy and what you should stay away from.

The interesting part of starting again, is understanding what you keep and what you choose to let go of. What motivates you, what drives you, what brings you joy. Simple good healthy food, continues to be my passion. If you are reading this and know the restaurant scene in the USA, then please feel free to recommend some places to try, and I will gladly try them and review them on this site!

I found this dish in a Japanese restaurant in Chelsea New York, as recommended by a friend from the UK, that I went to try out with a new foodie friend, Ms. M*. This particular dish brought us so much joy, that I decided to make my own version so we could eat them all the time. Ms. M was a patient taster and this is the version we deemed the best for its balance of simplicity and subtle umami undertone.

The restaurant dumplings use ricotta to add a smooth richness to the mixture and dilute the concentrated Edamame taste. I wanted mine to be vegan, so I substituted this with a little white miso, to create a similar affect. I kept the inside of the dumpling simple, as a part of the beauty of this dish is the burst of truffle from the drizzle of oil at the end.

This is a Tasha.Kitchen original, feel free to copy, creativity should be shared

*A little about Ms. M. She is a serial entrepreneur, among other things, running her own consultant firm (http://fayerconsulting.com) and charity (www.herhealtheq.org) dedicated to health equality for woman. She is a great travel and foodie partner in crime, a dedicated taster for Tasha.Kitchen, a genuinely amazing friend and an inspiration to us all.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup Edamame, shelled, cooked, drained
  • 1 teaspoon white miso paste
  • Salt, to taste
  • 20 wonton wrappers
  • 1-2 cups pre-made veggie broth, for steaming
  • Truffle oil for drizzling

Method

  • In a food processor, pulse together the Edamame and Miso. Taste and adjust for salt.
  • Lay half of the wonton wrappers out on your work surface. Set the rest in a pile next to you, along with a small bowl of water for sealing the edges
  • Spoon a teaspoon of filling in each
  • Wipe a bit of water on all 4 edges. Fold the wrapper in half to form a triangle
  • Simmer broth in a medium skillet. Add enough broth so that it covers the bottom of the pan at least an inch deep.
  • Drop wontons in the pan in a single later.
  • Cover and steam for about 2 minutes or until the wontons are cooked through but still al dente
  • Divide steamed wontons among plates, drizzle with the truffle oil
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